How Depression increases the risk for suicidal thoughts?

Blogger, Podcaster is of strong view that depression should be avoided at any cost.Just listen Podcast very carefully P07:: How Depression increases the risk for suicidal thoughts https://www.webmd.com/depression/guide/depression-recognizing-signs-of-suicide#1 Depression (major depressive disorder or clinical depression) is a common but serious mood disorder. It causes severe symptoms that affect how you feel, think, and handle daily […]

#131:P07:: How Depression increases the risk for suicidal thoughts?

https://www.hhs.gov/answers/mental-health-and-substance-abuse/does-depression-increase-risk-of-suicide/index.html

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Does depression increase the risk for suicide?

Although the majority of people who have depression do not die by suicide, having major depression does increase suicide risk compared to people without depression. The risk of death by suicide may, in part, be related to the severity of the depression.

New data on depression that has followed people over long periods of time suggests that about 2 percent of those people ever treated for depression in an outpatient setting will die by suicide. Among those ever treated for depression in an inpatient hospital setting, the rate of death by suicide is twice as high (4 percent).

Those treated for depression as inpatients following suicide ideation or suicide attempts are about three times as likely to die by suicide (6 percent) as those who were only treated as outpatients. There are also dramatic gender differences in lifetime risk of suicide in depression. Whereas about 7 percent of men with a lifetime history of depression will die by suicide, only 1 percent of women with a lifetime history of depression will die by suicide.

Another way of thinking of suicide risk and depression is to examine the lives of people who have died by suicide and see what proportion of them were depressed. From that perspective, it is estimated that about 60 percent of people who commit suicide have had a mood disorder (e.g., major depression, bipolar disorder, dysthymia). Younger persons who kill themselves often have a substance abuse disorder, in addition to being depressed.

Related Questions:

How does one deal with loneliness and suicidal thoughts?Answer235FollowRequestMoreThere is Help

Need Help? Contact a suicide hotline if you need someone to talk to. If you have a friend in need of help, please encourage that person to contact a suicide hotline as well.

– Worldwide
In general, if you’re outside the US, numbers for your country are here: Help a friend – Befrienders Worldwide. You can also e-mail jo@samaritans.org to talk to someone or go to http://www.samaritans.org/how-we… to speak with someone.

– United States
Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).
Para español, llame al 1-888-628-9454.

– Canada
Locate a crisis center in your area and at The Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention (link to: https://suicideprevention.ca/nee…). For youth under 20, you can call the Kids Help Phone at 1-800-668-6868.

– India
Visit AASRA or call their 24/7 helpline at +91-22-27546669 or +91-22-27546667. You can also e-mail aasrahelpline@yahoo.com.

– UK 116 123 (to reach the Samaritans in the UK)
– France (33) 01 46 21 46 46
– Australia 13 11 1485 AnswersSudhir Suvarna, One day I will win for my son’s sake. Answered February 16, 2017

It’s a shame that we live on a planet that has a population of around 7 billion ( maybe more ) and with access to people, at the touch of the button, that a lot of people feel lonely and have suicidal thoughts.

My question is what are these people doing on Earth? Why don’t they migrate to another planet if they are here just for themselves and not care about the people around them?

Perhaps, the people around them are busy checking their mobile phones, have social phobia, lost faith in humanity or for whatever reason, they just don’t want to connect with real people.

What are the best ways to deal with suicidal thoughts?

Here are some things I’ve found helpful. None of them work for me every time but at least one of them works for me every time. I’d be really curious to know if any of them work for you, or if you come up with other things that you find helpful.

  1. Tell another human being what you’re thinking. Saying thoughts out loud can defuse some of their power.
  2. As much as possible, try to see the thoughts as thoughts and the feelings as feelings. We tend to experience our thoughts and feelings as though they were immutable facts instead of transitory phenomena.
  3. Have a sandwich. This isn’t meant to be condescending–it just helps sometimes.
  4. If plagued by obsessive, intrusive thoughts, it can help to interrupt yourself by counting 1, 2, 3, etc each time you notice that your mind is back on that topic. You might find that you can only count up to 1 before the thought intrudes again. That’s okay, just keep counting.
  5.  
  6. Never underestimate the power of postponement. If possible, make a deal with yourself that you’ll re-evaluate your situation tomorrow. If that seems too far off, how about an hour? When the next hour comes, just do it again. A lot of time can be lived through that way.
  7.  
  8. Write a nice long juicy letter to the world, first telling it all the things you’ll miss about it, then all the things you won’t miss at all.
  9. For a short time, say ten minutes, see if it’s possible to be a little bit curious about the experience you’re having. Are there any edges to your thoughts and feelings, or are they absolutely the same all the way through? Is there a temperature? A weight? A scent? Can you visualize yourself from 20 feet away, or from 2 days in the future?
  10. For a really short time, say two minutes, write down each and every thought you are having just as you’re having it. Then do the same thing for another two minutes with your feelings.
  11. Then do another two minutes with the sensations in your body. Just keep the pen moving and scribble down anything you experience. Was it the exact same thing over and over for the whole two minutes, or was there a tiny bit of variation, say between panic to boredom to tiredness to annoyance, for instance.
  12. Ask yourself: if there’s even a little bit of variation in my internal state in just two minutes, is it at all possible that there would be a lot of change in my internal state in a week, a month, a year, even if it doesn’t feel like that now?
  13. The 20% rule: just as an experiment, is it possible to cut yourself 20% of slack for the next 24 hours?
  14. Again, just as an experiment, get a bag of some kind and go for a very long walk, picking up trash as you go. Just notice if you feel any different after two or three hours of this. If so, great. If not, also fine.

 

 

 

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Here are some things I’ve found helpful. None of them work for me every time but at least one of them works for me every time. I’d be really curious to know if any of them work for you, or if you come up with other things that you find helpful.

Tell another human being what you’re thinking. Saying thoughts out loud can defuse some of their power.
As much as possible, try to see the thoughts as thoughts and the feelings as feelings. We tend to experience our thoughts and feelings as though they were immutable facts instead of transitory phenomena.


Have a sandwich. This isn’t meant to be condescending–it just helps sometimes.
If plagued by obsessive, intrusive thoughts, it can help to interrupt yourself by counting 1, 2, 3, etc each time you notice that your mind is back on that topic. You might find that you can only count up to 1 before the thought intrudes again. That’s okay, just keep counting.
Never underestimate the power of postponement.

If possible, make a deal with yourself that you’ll re-evaluate your situation tomorrow. If that seems too far off, how about an hour? When the next hour comes, just do it again. A lot of time can be lived through that way.
Write a nice long juicy letter to the world, first telling it all the things you’ll miss about it, then all the things you won’t miss at all.


For a short time, say ten minutes, see if it’s possible to be a little bit curious about the experience you’re having. Are there any edges to your thoughts and feelings, or are they absolutely the same all the way through? Is there a temperature? A weight? A scent? Can you visualize yourself from 20 feet away, or from 2 days in the future?


For a really short time, say two minutes, write down each and every thought you are having just as you’re having it. Then do the same thing for another two minutes with your feelings. Then do another two minutes with the sensations in your body. Just keep the pen moving and scribble down anything you experience.

Was it the exact same thing over and over for the whole two minutes, or was there a tiny bit of variation, say between panic to boredom to tiredness to annoyance, for instance. Ask yourself: if there’s even a little bit of variation in my internal state in just two minutes, is it at all possible that there would be a lot of change in my internal state in a week, a month, a year, even if it doesn’t feel like that now?


The 20% rule: just as an experiment, is it possible to cut yourself 20% of slack for the next 24 hours?
Again, just as an experiment, get a bag of some kind and go for a very long walk, picking up trash as you go. Just notice if you feel any different after two or three hours of this. If so, great. If not, also fine.


If the questioner is young, I have something to offer. When I was a teenager, I went deep into the hole of depression and anxiety, to which I had been vulnerable all my life. I did not get along comfortably with people, and I believed that there was something intrinsically wrong with me, that I was somehow deeply flawed and could never find happiness like other people seemed to do so easily. I knew that my parents loved me, but I felt that they loved me out of pity and didn’t really know me anyway.

I made a promise to myself that I would not kill myself until I was 35, that if I lasted that long and things were the same, I would be free to give up at that point. I felt that I was constantly faking being normal and pretending to be alive. But I really felt already dead, so tired all the time, so tired of making a pretense of being like other people. I used to dream that I was on a steep roof where other people were dancing around and having a lot of fun.

They could carry on as if the roof were not steep, but I was barely able to stay on the roof, constantly in danger of slipping off, and it was so hard to pull off the act that everything was OK. Doing the things I was supposed to be doing was such a huge effort. I wanted to be dead in reality because I felt dead already. The effort to fake being alive was too exhausting.

I hope that you do not feel this way, but if you do, please let me tell you that it is going to pass. Remember this: You are not flawed, you are not abnormal, there is nothing intrinsically wrong with you. You are a very strong person who has already had to deal with black feelings that most people never experience. Going on when you feel depressed is an act of amazing strength. Depression is an illness, not the consequence of a flawed character, and it happens to people who have a shortage of certain brain chemicals that keep their mood steady.

When such people are stressed, they use up all their serotonin and dopamine, and without an abundance of those chemicals, they fall into the hole of depression. It is not unlike diabetes, where people have a shortage of insulin, without which they become very ill. Luckily, they can take insulin to make up for their lack, and no one thinks that they have a character flaw because they have to take insulin. The same is true of people who get depression. There are now medicines that augment serotonin and dopamine, and they fix the shortage that happens when stress uses up your own supply.

What I have learned is that I am not intrinsically flawed. As time passed, I came to learn that if I fall into the hole, I will be able to come back out. And I learned that I could be happy in my life just like other people, and even find love and true friendship. This depression does not define you, it is not who you are. A psychiatrist told me something that I try to remember when I am depressed.

“Depression tells lies.” It tells you that you are broken or flawed and that there is no hope, but it is just the lies that are told by depression. The thoughts you think about yourself when you are depressed are not true. When you are not depressed, you will see the truth, that you are a fine person who had a bout of depression.

In some ways, you and I are stronger than most other people, who never have to overcome the sadness that we have experienced. I have been able to experience happiness, a lot of happiness. And you will too. This will pass. You will find medicines that help you when you feel depressed and anxious. You will realize that you are a special person with wonderful creative qualities, and you will find someone to love you for everything that you are.AnonymousUpdated September 22, 2013.          What are the best ways to deal with suicidal thoughts?

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